2014-2015 Catalog

ANTH - ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 1100 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Physical Anthropology is the scientific study of humans as biological organisms: our biological diversity, our evolutionary relationships to other organisms, and our origins, including the study of living primates, human variation, and the fossils of human ancestors and related species. It also includes Forensic Anthropology, the scientific study of human remains in the advanced stages of decomposition or otherwise mutilated.

4

Corequisites

ANTH 1101

ANTH 1200 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Studied are the structures and functioning of various societies and cultures, including aspects of language, warfare, religion, kinship, economics and political organizations. A number of widely divergent but representative cultures are examined in detail, along with their resultant changes due to industrial contact.

3

ANTH 1300 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

Archaeology covers the excavation of man's past culture, tool traditions, social developments, migration patterns and independent developments of civilization on various continents. Included are dating methods, site analysis, comparative studies, and various archaeologic techniques used in the field and laboratory.

3

ANTH 1350 ROCK ART:

Students will examine rock art throughout the region. The course will introduce the student to rock art as an important part of the cultural landscape and provide an introduction to the cultural, historical, and diagnostic features of rock art in the West.

2

Prerequisites

Instructor Permission

ANTH 2200 WORLD CULTURE

This  course  surveys  peoples  and  cultures  in  various  times  and  places,  and provides an understanding of cultural behavior of people in numerous geographical areas.  Students read ethnographies, written by cultural anthropologists, and respond to research conducted around the world through classroom discussions and written assignments.  Culture contact and Scientific Method are emphasized, as well as ethics and the role of the researcher.  Specific cultures emphasized will vary each semester.

3

ANTH 2210 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS

A comparative study of North American Indians using the culture area concept. Major areas covered are the Arctic, Northwest Coast, Northeastern and Southeastern Interior, Plains, Mountains and Basin, Southwest, Mexico and Yucatan. This includes a brief history of the various groups since European contact.

3

ANTH 2310 ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD METHODS:

Students in this course will study Archaeological field methods used throughout the world. This course is designed to help the student gain knowledge about specific Archaeological methods by working on location, and how to work and live in diverse cultures. Maximum of 4 credits applied towards graduation.

1-4

Prerequisites

Instructor Permission

ANTH 2311 PREHISTORIC ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD METHODS

This class will deal directly with several important areas of field archaeology: inventory, site documentation and evaluation, and excavation. Course topics will include appropriate techni- ques of site testing and evaluation criteria, and research topics for data recovery during large scale excavation projects. Parti- cipants will be introduced to site instrument mapping, principles of natural and cultural stratigraphy, proper testing and excava- tion techniques, and proper methods of recordkeeping and provenience collection. Maximum of 4 credits applied towards graduation.

1-4

ANTH 2312 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD METHODS

Archaeology is the study of human behavior by means of its material traces through all time in all places. This course will deal with excavation, treatment, cataloguing, and analysis of artifacts excavated from historical sites around south-western Wyoming, such as South Pass City, Ft. Bridger, stage stations, and other sites of roughly the last 200 years (in Wyoming this means roughly 1790 to the present). Maximum of 4 credits applied towards graduation.

1-4

Prerequisites

Instructor Permission

ANTH 2380 GLOBAL CULTURES TOUR:

This course provides students with the opportunity to travel to various global destinations. A variety of topics may be explored while traveling, including anthropology, art, geography, history, international travel logistics, language, and local culture. The goal of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to better understand global societies and cultures. Travel destinations can vary from year to year. This course is approved for S/U grading.

1-4

Prerequisites

Instructor Permission