2014-2015 Catalog

PHIL - PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 1000 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

This introductory course is designed to provide a sampling of some of the important ideas and issues of philosophy as they relate to us today. It consists of reading and discussion of classical and contemporary writers who address such questions as how we should live our lives, whether or not we have free will, and what we can know about the nature of reality and of the mind.

3

PHIL 2300 ETHICS

Students will examine some of the principle theories of ethical behavior, including Relativism, Egoism, Utilitarianism, Deontology and Virtue Ethics, and will apply these theories to discussions of conduct in our private and public lives, as well as to some contemporary societal debates.

3

PHIL 2310 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

This course is a systematic examination of philosophical questions, arguments and theories arising from the study of religion. Topics to be studied may include reason and religion, proofs for the existence and nature of God, the character of religious language, attempts to determine the authenticity of religious experience, religion and ethics, and God and evil.

3

Prerequisites

PHIL 1000

PHIL 2315 COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS

This course introduces students to some of the major religious traditions that have guided and continue to guide the thoughts and actions of believers. Specifically, students will gain familiarity with religious traditions such as those originating in India (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Sikhism), in the Far East (Taoism, Confucianism, and Shintoism) in the Middle East (Islam, Judaism and Christianity), and in Native American and African tribal societies. Students will gain insight into the commonalities among and the key differences between these various religious traditions. They should also achieve a fuller appreciation of and respect for the practitioners of other religions.

3